Christopher Connolly

Lecturer In Twentieth-Century Chinese History
School of Asian Studies
Schools of History and Asian Studies
University College Cork
Cork
Ireland

T: 353 (0)21 4902640
F: 353 (0)21 4903825
E: chris.connolly@ucc.ie

Dr. Chris Connolly is a native of County Antrim and joined U.C.C. in September 2007 as Lecturer in Modern Chinese History in both the School of History and School of Asian Studies.

He received his B.A. in Oriental Studies (Chinese) from the University of Cambridge in 2002, and his PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2007 with a thesis entitled `Barbarians in the South: China's Vietnam Policy, 1966-73'. In 2006 he was a visiting scholar at the George Washington University in Washington D.C.

His research interests are 20th-century Chinese foreign policy, China's relations with Southeast Asia and the United States, China in the Cold War, and late 18th century Sino-British interactions


My research is primarily concerned with the foreign policy of Mao's China, with particular reference to the People's Republic of China's relations with the states of South East Asia, and Sino-American relations, though I have an enduring interest in the history of the Vietnam War and the foreign policies of both the Johnson and Nixon administrations.

Handling Barbarians in the South analyses the connections between Sino-American rapprochement and China's Vietnam War policy, drawing on original archival research in the United States, as well as utilizing much of the new Chinese literature that has become available on these topics. It is the first book to comprehensively examine China's policy towards its Vietnamese comrades and how it was influenced by Mao's evolving perception of the United States. It also challenges some of the basic assumptions that have underpinned much of the literature on the process of Sino-American rapprochement, demonstrating that China was largely faithful to Hanoi's war aims, even though the two communist allies differed greatly on tactics. It also shows that the origins of Beijing's support for Hanoi were much more deeply rooted in traditional Sino-centrism than in standard notions of Marxist internationalist ideology, throwing light once more onto the role of ideas and culture as factors in foreign policy formulation, contested notions that continue to have relevance in the contemporary world.

Peer Reviewed Journals

 YearPublication
(2010)'Kissinger, China, Congress, and the Lost Chance for Peace in Cambodia'
Connolly, Chris; (2010) 'Kissinger, China, Congress, and the Lost Chance for Peace in Cambodia' Globe icon [DOI] [Full Text] [Details]
(2005)'The American Factor: Sino-American Rapprochement and Chinese Attitudes to the Vietnam War'
Chris Connolly; (2005) 'The American Factor: Sino-American Rapprochement and Chinese Attitudes to the Vietnam War' Globe icon [DOI] [Details]

Book Review

 YearPublication
(2011)Review of 'Passport to Peking: A Very British Mission to Mao's China' by Patrick Wright.
Chris Connolly; (2011) Review of 'Passport to Peking: A Very British Mission to Mao's China' by Patrick Wright. London: Book Reviews Globe icon [Details]
(2010)Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line by Michael Szony.
Connolly, Chris; (2010) Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line by Michael Szony. Book Reviews Globe icon [DOI] [Details]

Newspaper Articles

 YearPublication
(2009)China at 60.
Chris Connolly; (2009) China at 60. The Irish Examiner: Newspaper Articles [Details]

Associations

 AssocationFunctionFrom / To
Association of Chinese Political Studies member/
Society for the History of American Foreign Relations member/

Employment

 EmployerPositionFrom / To
Schools of History and Asian Studies Lecturer in Twentieth-Century Chinese History01-SEP-07 /

Education

 YearInstituionQualificationSubject
2002Cambridge University BAOriental Studies (Chinese)
2007LSE PhDInternational History